Aleph and the USA media

(you can also read the readers comments (no censorship) in the sidebar) >>>

“A new tale of magical longing. . . . Masterful.” —San Francisco Chronicle

“Coelho is a novelist who writes in a universal language.” —The New York Times

“Vivid, captivating. . . . So engaging that readers will not want to put it down for even a fraction of a second. As the author sets out on his journey, the reader gets the sense that, he too, is embarking on the same voyage.” —The International Herald Tribune

“[A] chimerical tale. . . . There’s no better author to serve such a work than Coelho.” —Publishers Weekly

“Enigmatic. . . . An illuminating book.” —The National

“Borges set the standard that Coelho capably upholds. . . . Coelho the writer is both discerning and revealing of Coelho the protagonist, whose enthusiasms we share.” —The Washington Independent Review

Aleph is a book written by the soul, and for the soul. And when you have finished the last word on the last page, your eternal spirit will be dancing with joy.” —Cecilia Samartin, author of Broken Paradise

Reading Paulo’s book is such a magical experience. This book will truly open doors to self-discovery that you didn’t know existed. ALEPH holds the key to that doorway. Brendon Burchard, author of the #1 New York Times bestseller, “The Millionaire Messenger”

“It’s time for American readers to set out on a journey of discovery that will lead them to the works of this exceptional writer.” —USA Today

AT&T Archives: Seeing the Digital Future (1961)

In 1961, the digital future was just starting to come to fruition. And the Bell System had a number of products that had either just come onto the market, or were incipient, that implemented these new computer technologies. In December 1960, AT&T had just announced an investment of $250 billion dollars for satellite communications and improving the network for data services and computer communication.

In 1958, AT&T had just announced its first modem. Springing from technologies used for the computerized navigation of missiles, the modem, i.e. the Data-Phone, was rolled out in a few markets in the midwest. It would be made commercially available throughout the network by 1960. The Data-Phone could transmit at up to a bit-rate of 110 bits per second.

This film breaks into approximately two parts — part I: the problems of the present, and part II: the way those problems could be solved by the technology of the future. This film not only serves as almost the birth of the information age, it also projects that technology far into the future.

The commercial products that would allow this connected, computer-communicating network? They’re basic, but at the time seemed radical:

* The wireless Bellboy Pager, which was introduced commercially in 1962
* The Data-phone, which was supposed to revolutionize business communications
* The videophone—shown as a credit-card-reading vertical two-way television
* The card-reading phone or automatic dialer, which would dial a number from small plastic punch cards, introduced in 1961