1 MIN reading: the blind man and the Everest (ENG/PORT)


Erik Weihenmayer

Little by little we seem to grow used to the same metaphors for life. I met a reader in Hamburg who decides to share his experience with me about climbing in life. He discovered what hotel I am in, and has some criticism to make of my page in the Internet. After making some harsh comments, he asks:
“Can a blind man climb Mount Everest?”
“I don’t think so,” I answer.
“Why don’t you answer ‘perhaps’?”

I am almost certain that I am in the company of a “compulsive optimist.” One thing is the whole universe conspiring for our dreams to become true, quite another is to place yourself in front of absolutely unnecessary challenges, which can lead to death or unpredictable failure.
I explain that I have to leave for an appointment, but the reader does not give up.

“The blind can climb Everest, the highest mountain in the world (8,848 meters). Not only can they do it, but I happen to know of at least one blind person who did it. His name is Erik Weihenmayer. In 2001, Weihenmayer managed the feat. Meanwhile, people complain that they cannot afford a better car, more elegant clothes, and a salary that matches their abilities.”
“Are you sure?”
But we are interrupted in our conversation; it is time for the appointment that has brought me to Hamburg. I thank him for his attention, ask him to send me suggestions for my page on the Internet, we take another picture and then say goodbye.

At three o’clock in the morning, returning from that event, I reach into my pocket for the key to my room and discover the piece of paper where he had jotted down the blind man’s name.
Even knowing that I have to travel to Cairo in a couple of hours, I turn on the computer, and there it is:

“On 25 May 2001, at the age of 32, Erik Weihenmayer became the first blind person to reach the top of the highest mountain in the world. A former high-school teacher, he received the ESPN and IDEA prize for his courage in overcoming the limits that his physical condition permitted. Besides Everest, Erik Weihenmayer has climbed the other seven highest mountains in the world, including Aconcagua in Argentina and Kilimanjaro in Tanzania”.

______________________
PORTUGUES

encontro com um leitor em Hamburgo, que resolve dividir comigo sua experiíªncia a respeito das escaladas na vida. Descobriu em que hotel estou, tem uma série de crí­ticas sobre a minha página na internet. Faz comentários duros, e depois pergunta:
– Pode um cego escalar o monte Everest?
– Acho que ní£o – respondo.
– Por que vocíª ní£o responde: talvez?

Já tenho quase certeza que estou diante de um “otimista compulsivo.” Uma coisa é o universo inteiro conspirar para que nossos sonhos sejam realizados, outra coisa é colocar-se diante de desafios absolutamente desnecessários, que podem resultar em morte ou em fracassos previsí­veis.
Explico que tenho que sair para um compromisso, mas o leitor ní£o desiste.
– Cegos podem escalar o Everest, a montanha mais alta do mundo ( 8.848 metros). Ní£o apenas podem, como sei que pelo menos um deles escalou. Seu nome é Erik Weihenmayer. Em 2001, Weihenmayer conseguiu. E enquanto isso, as pessoas ficam se queixando que ní£o conseguem um carro melhor, uma roupa mais elegante, um salário í  altura de suas capacidades.
Somos interrompidos em nossa conversa, é hora do compromisso que me trouxe até Hamburgo. Agradeí§o sua atení§í£o, peí§o que me envie sugestíµes sobre a minha página na internet, tiramos mais uma foto, e nos despedimos.

í€s tríªs horas da manhí£, voltando do tal evento, coloco a mí£o no bolso para pegar a chave do quarto, e descubro o papel onde havia anotado o tal nome. Mesmo sabendo que tenho que viajar para o Cairo em algumas horas, ligo o computador, e ali está:

“No dia 25 de maio de 2001, aos 32 anos de idade, Erik Weihenmayer se tornou o primeiro cego a atingir o topo da montanha mais alta do mundo. Ex-professor de ginásio, recebeu o príªmio da ESPN e da IDEA por sua coragem em ir além dos limites que sua condií§í£o fí­sica permitia. Além do Everest, Erik Weihenmayer escalou as outras sete montanhas mais altas do planeta, entre as quais o Aconcagua (Argentina) e o Kilimanjaro (Tanzania)”.