Archives for June 2013

The waterfall effect

The warrior knows about the ‘waterfall effect’.

He has often seen someone mistreating another person who lacks the courage to respond.
Then, out of cowardice and resentment, that person vents his anger on someone weaker than himself,
who takes it out on someone else,
in a veritable torrent of misery.

No one knows the consequences of his own cruelty.
That is why the warrior is careful in his use of the sword and only accepts an opponent who is worthy of him.

In moments of rage, he punches a rock and bruises his hand.
The hand will heal eventually, but the child who got beaten because his father lost a battle will bear the marks for the rest of his life

in The Warrior of the Light: a Manual

The waterfall effect

The warrior knows about the ‘waterfall effect’.
He has often seen someone mistreating another person who lacks the courage to respond.

Then, out of cowardice and resentment, that person vents his anger on someone weaker than himself, who takes it out on someone else, in a veritable torrent of misery.
No one knows the consequences of his own cruelty.

That is why the warrior is careful in his use of the sword and only accepts an opponent who can fight with him.
In moments of rage, he punches a rock and bruises his hand.

The hand will heal eventually, but the child who got beaten because his father lost a battle will bear the marks for the rest of his life

20 sec reading: The chess game


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PORTUGUES: O jogo de xadrez

ESPANOL: La partida de ajedrez
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A young man said to the abbot from the monastery of Melk:
– I’d actually like to be a monk, but I haven’t learned anything in life. All my father taught me was to play chess, which does not lead to enlightenment. Apart from that, I learned that all games are a sin.
– They may be a sin but they can also be a diversion, and who knows, this monastery needs a little of both – was the reply.

The abbot asked for a chess board, sent for a monk and told him to play the young man.
But before the game began, he added:

– Although we need diversion, we cannot allow everyone to play chess the whole time. So, we only have the best players here; if our monk loses, he will leave the monastery and his place will be yours.
The abbot was serious. The young man knew he was playing for his life, and broke into a cold sweat; the chess board became the center of the world.
The monk began badly. The young man attacked, but then saw the saintly look on the other man’s face; at that moment, he began playing badly on purpose.
After all, he would rather lose, a monk is far more useful to the world.

Suddenly, the abbot threw the chess board to the floor.
– You have learned far more than was taught you – he said. – You concentrated yourself enough to win, were capable of fighting for that which you desire.

“Then, you had compassion, and were willing to make a sacrifice in the name of a noble cause. Welcome, because the secret of life is to know how to balance discipline with compassion.”

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1 Min reading: unanswered questions (ENG, ESPA, PORT)


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PORTUGUES: Perguntas sem resposta

ESPANOL: Preguntas sin respuesta

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Climbing up a track in the Pyrenees in search of somewhere to practice archery, I came upon a small French army camp, where I met a colonel who asks me if I am the writer. And then, getting over his almost visible shyness, he tells me that he too has written a book and begins to explain me the curious genesis of his work.

He and his wife made donations for a leper child who originally lived in India but was later transferred to France. One fine day, curious to meet the little girl, they went to the convent where the nuns took care of the child. One of the nuns asked if he would help in the spiritual education of the group of children who lived there. Jean Paul Sétau (the officer’s name) said that he had no experience teaching the catechism but that he would give it some thought and ask God what he should do.

That night, after saying his prayers, he heard the answer: “instead of offering answers, try to find out what the children want to ask.”

From then on Sétau had the idea of visiting several schools, asking children for the questions to be put in writing, so that the more timid among the pupils would lose their fear of exposing themselves.

Here are some of them:

Where do we go after we die?

Why are we afraid of strangers?

Are there extra-terrestrial beings?

Why do accidents happen even to people who believe in God?

Why are we born, if in the end we die?

Who invented war and happiness?

Does the Lord also listen to those who do not believe in the same (Catholic) God?

Why are there poor and sick people?

Why did God create mosquitoes and flies?

Why isn’t the guardian angel close by when we are sad?

Why do we love some people and hate others?

Who gave names to the colors?

If God is in heaven and my mother is up there too because she died, how can He be alive?

I hope that some teachers or parents who read feel stimulated to do the same thing. In that way, instead of trying to impose our adult understanding of the universe, we will end up remembering some of our questions as children – and which were never really answered.

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