20 sec reading: Lost and found

Each work of art could easily say:
‘I want to be noticed and I’m going to get out of here.
So I can share my efforts with my brothers and sisters’

And as it is with vases, paintings, sculptures, so it is with men and women.
And so it is with tribes and ships and trees and stars.

Once we understand this, we can sit next to our neighbour at the end of the day and listen with respect to what he has to say and say what he needs to hear.
And neither of us will try to impose our ideas on the other.

Beyond the mountains that separate the tribes, beyond the distance that separates bodies, there exists the community of spirits.
We are part of that, and there are no streets peopled with pointless words, only broad avenues that connect what is distant and sometimes have to be repaired because of the damage caused by time.

And the man who, yesterday, was seen as an enemy because there was a war being waged, will now be seen as a friend again, because the war is over and life goes on.

The son who left will eventually return, and he will return rich in the experiences he had along the way.
His father will receive him with open arms and say to his servants: ‘Bring the best robe for him and put a ring on his finger and sandals on his feet; because my son was dead and is alive again, he was lost and is found.’

Thus, the returning lover will never be eyed with distrust, because loyalty accompanies his/her every step.
 
 
taken from THE MANUSCRIPT FOUND IN ACCRA