The moving monument

With very rare exceptions (Rio de Janeiro is one of them with its statue of Christ the Redeemer), it is not the statues that mark the city, but the least expected things.

When Eiffel built a steel tower for an exposition, he could not have dreamed that this would end up being the symbol of Paris, despite the Louvre, the Arc de Triomphe, and the impressive gardens.

An apple represents New York.

A not much visited bridge is the symbol of San Francisco. A bridge over the Tejo is also on the postcards of Lisbon.

Barcelona, a city full of unresolved things, has an unfinished cathedral (The Holy Family) as its most emblematic monument.

In Moscow, a square surrounded by buildings and a name that no longer represents the present (Red Square, in memory of communism) is the main reference.

And so on and so forth.

Perhaps thinking about this, Geneva decided to create a monument that would never remain the same, one that could disappear every night and reappear the next morning and would change at each and every moment of the day, depending on the strength of the wind and the rays of the sun.

Legend has it that a child had the idea just as he was … taking a pee. When he finished his business, he told his father that the place where they lived would be protected from invaders if it had a sculpture capable of vanishing before they drew near.

His father went to talk to the town councilors, who, even though they had adopted Protestantism as the official religion and considered everything that escaped logic as superstition, decided to follow the advice.

Another story tells us that, because a river pouring into a lake produced a very strong current, a hydroelectric dam was built there, but when the workers returned home and closed the valves, the pressure was very strong and the turbines eventually burst.

Until an engineer had the idea of putting a fountain on the spot where the excess water could escape. With the passing of time, engineering solved the problem and the fountain became unnecessary.

But perhaps reminded of the legend of the little boy, the inhabitants decided to keep it.

The city already had many fountains, and this one would be in the middle of a lake, so what could be done to make it visible? And that is how the moving monument came to be.

Powerful pumps were installed, and today a very strong jet of water spouts 500 liters per second vertically at 200 km per hour.

They say, and I have confirmed it, that it can even be seen from a plane flying at 10,000 meters.

It has no special name, just ‘Water Fountain’, the symbol of the city of Geneva (where there is no lack of statues of men on horses, heroic women and solitary children).

Once I asked Denise, a Swiss scientist, what she thought of the Water Fountain. “Our body is almost completely made of water through which electric discharges pass to convey information.

One such piece of information is called love, and this can interfere in the entire organism.

Love changes all the time.

I think that the symbol of Geneva is the most beautiful monument to love yet conceived by any artist.” I don’t know how the little boy in the legend would feel about it, but I think that Denise is absolutely right.